Eat butter? Are you crazy?

Probably not. New research has shown that eating low fat pructs is bad for you and eating real butter from grass fed cows is really good for you and also, believe it or not, can make you lose weight!

Authority Nutrition has 7 good reasons for you to beat butter.

  1. Butter is Rich in Fat-Soluble Vitamins
  2. Butter Contains a Lot of Healthy Saturated Fats
  3. Butter Lowers Heart Attack Risk Compared to Margarine
  4. Butter is a Good Source of The Fatty Acid Butyrate
  5. Butter is Rich in Conjugated Linoleic Acid
  6. Butter is Associated With a Lower Risk of Obesity
  7. Butter is delicious

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Food renegade says:

1. BUTTER IS MORE “HEART-HEALTHY”
2. BUTTER CONTAINS CANCER-FIGHTING FATS
3. BUTTER PROTECTS AGAINST DEGENERATIVE ARTHRITIS
4. BUTTER PROMOTES A HEALTHY BRAIN & NERVOUS SYSTEM
5. BUTTER PROTECTS THE GUT

Read more …

Even AARP knows!
Ninety-nine million Americans have high cholesterol, and most of what they know about their condition is probably wrong. We’ve asked medical experts to weigh in on seven common cholesterol misconceptions.

Myth: Cholesterol is bad

Truth: Cholesterol is like cake, good in moderation. It’s misleading to call cholesterol an evil, artery-clogging fat because cholesterol performs a lot of important functions.

Myth: A low-fat diet is best

Truth: Bring back the butter. Research is challenging the decades-old notion that saturated fat — found primarily in meat, butter and cheese — is the leading cause of clogged arteries and heart disease. While saturated fat does increase LDL (“bad”) cholesterol, it also increases HDL (“good”) cholesterol. Plus, there are other dietary villains — such as too much sugar and carbohydrates — that can also lead to a buildup of artery-clogging particles. A study published last year in theAnnals of Internal Medicine found no link between eating saturated fats and increased risk of heart attacks. Foods high or low in saturated fat can be harmful, beneficial or neutral, depending on the type of food, says Dariush Mozaffarian, M.D., a coauthor of the study and dean of the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University. A low-carb diet — meaning low in foods like white bread, white rice, potatoes, crackers and sugar — is more effective for raising “good” cholesterol and reducing triglycerides, he says. Adding healthy fats, such as nuts and olive oil, can also help reduce the risk of heart attack and stroke

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